Dried flowers have spent the last decade kicking their old fashioned reputation to the kerb. This sensational floral revival ticks all the right boxes: they are eco-friendly, practical, beautiful, and last for ages. What more could a wedding planner or bride want?

Dried flowers are replacing fresh and imported blooms as the go-to bridal bouquet for a reason. It’s hard to not fall in love with their sun bleached beauty, subtle hues, and variety of textures. From Perth to the Gold Coast and everywhere in between, the year’s biggest floristry trend has got to be dried flowers grown right here in Australia.

The appeal of dried flowers doesn’t just stop at bouquets. Boutonnières, table setting decor, backdrops, centrepieces, and picturesque arches for photo ops are all getting the dried flower makeover treatment. Beach wedding? Think dried palm leaves, baskets of grasses and rushes, and earthenware pots of seeds. Formal black tie do? How gorgeous would dried ornamental branches with touches of bamboo and fronds of dried ferns be? The possibilities are endless.

Because dried flowers lend themselves to versatility so effortlessly, you can pick a colour scheme, thematic flower, or mix elements until you find the ideal combination for what you have in mind.

And believe us when we say the wedding cake will be eaten and the gifts unwrapped, and your beautiful dried flower wedding bouquet will still be as picture-perfect as the day you got married!

 

 

The corporate & hospitality industry image is set to become all about dried flowers

For the last one hundred years, visitors walking into hotels and corporate entrance halls and lobbies could be assured of one thing - there was always going to be a big bowl of fresh flowers positioned somewhere within eyesight.

That ostentatious display of nature’s bounty was seen to represent many things; success, luxury, and a warm welcome.

With the rapidly changing business and hospitality landscape, fresh flowers are kind of seen as so last century. The workforce stays at home and so do most of the visitors. Banks have apps, brokers use Zoom, and businesses have websites.

A clean, modern approach to decor has permeated the hospitality industry as well. Air B&Bs leave little notes saying how to use the entertainment system, self-catering accommodation place a tin of bikkies next to the kettle, and hotels are leaning more toward trimming the non-essentials and passing those savings onto the customer.

And then they discovered dried flower bouquets. Corporate entrances and hotel lobbies will never be the same again! Visitors still get a floral arrangement greeting them when they walk through the door, but it’s no longer seen as wasteful because a corporate or hospitality dried flower arrangement lasts forever.

It’s possible to dry almost any flower and foliage. Once they are dry, there’s no shedding, no pollen, no water spillage, and no expensive florist accounts are needed to replace the arrangements every few days. As far as the corporate and hospitality industries are concerned, making the move to dried flower arrangements is a win-win.

Dried floral bouquets don’t limit a colour scheme or image. There is a wide choice of themes and textures available: bold stems in pastels or dark earthy colours, seed pods, and ethereal grasses.

  • Grasses – barley, wheat, pampas, fern, and catkins
  • Leaves – eucalyptus, bay, laurel
  • Fronds – palm, foxtail, bulrush
  • Branches - Silver dollar lunaria, cotton bolls, pussy willow
  • Plants - Thistles, artichokes, craspedia
  • Flowers – Proteas, hydrangeas, roses,
  • Pods – physalis, lotus, poppy

But what about the beautiful scent a big fresh flower arrangement brings to a lobby, some of you may be asking? The hospitality industry uses diffusers filled with luxury scents (linked to the seasons) for their lobbies, communal areas, and guest’s rooms now.

Dried flowers bring elegance, beauty, and an eco-conscious ethos to corporations and accommodation suppliers. And the best thing is: there will be no more angry guests asking how they are going to get stamen pollen out of their clothing!